Support of 2015 Korean Comfort Women Agreement

Young girls and women were used as comfort women to predominantly satisfy the needs of military men. These gals were forced into performing sexual favors and were kept in comfort stations from 1932 through 1945 when the war ended. They were meant to improve the morale of the Japanese soldiers by attempting to reduce sexual assaults. Some of the comfort women did so voluntarily while others were abducted and lured and sent to comfort stations against their will. Comfort stations existed in China, Burma, Japan, and Korea.

 

 

South Korea currently announces that they are deciding whether they want to agree with Japan when it comes to Korean women who were required to engage as sex slaves to the Japanese military during World War II. President of South Korea, Moon Jae-in is requesting that the agreement in December 2015 between the two countries be settled. When Moon was elected in May, one of his promises was to revisit the issue of Korean comfort women . The government never represented them during active negotiations. After a decade of deliberations, the problem is being reconsidered.

South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-who recently stated that her country would not renegotiate the agreement of December 2015 regarding the issue of comfort women. Her proclamation puts an end to the conjecture that President Moon Jae-in would push for the revision of the agreement by his predecessor Park Geun-Hye from two years prior.

A Special Task Force appointed Moon Jae-in to delve into the 2015 deal and announce the findings of that investigation. Furthermore, the Special Task Force believes the agreement was faulty and criticized the South Korean government for not speaking with comfort women survivors. Moon’s report regarding the issue created a strong response from Tokyo. A fervent warning from Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono to Seoul expressly states that a revision or renegotiation of the agreement of 2015 between Japan and South Korea would be a mistake.

The “ comfort women stories ” matter that denotes women utilized by Japanese authorities predominantly for sexual favors during World War II has been a tough issue between Japan and Korea for some time. Efforts to resolve the conflicts regarding this concern began in the 1990s. The determination for a resolution began in 1993 by Chief Cabinet Secretary Yohei Kono who is the father of Taro Kono who recognized the involvement of Japan’s Imperial Army who formed many of the “comfort women” stations.

In 1995, Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama stated he is extremely apologetic about the wartime atrocities in Japan, and a final effort to resolve the issue involved the formation of the Asian Women’s Fund to achieve an Atonement Project for the “comfort women” to allow them financial compensation and health care aide. Such efforts, however, were met with resistance by Tokyo, especially the Asian Women’s Fund that was viewed as an “unofficial” entity. Seoul and “comfort women” victims continue to seek compensation from Japan.

The issue continues to spread between the two countries, especially after some public groups set up figures of young girls to symbolize “comfort women” like the one in 2011 by the Japanese Embassy in Seoul. Since then, the statues have been set up, not only in Korea but also in the United States, Australia, and some other European countries, which added further pressure between South Korea and Japan. The agreement of December 2015 was projected to end negatively, but South Korea continues to seek atonement from the Japanese government regarding the ongoing issue of “comfort women.” It is surmised that any revisions of the agreement would damage any relations between Japan and South Korea. The most recent deliberations ensure the survival of the agreement although current issues may have caused some friction with the Japanese government.